Randy Moss: The Strength, Speed, Charisma and Fallacy of 81

(Photo:Matt Slocum, AP)
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All you haters….

(posted this on January 12, 2008  on the old site. Obviously posting it here because of Moss’ impending retirement. I wrote this during a time period when many Black athletes were characterized as straight criminals…hence the push back)

Think to yourselves and make a list of the current ten best players in the National Football League. Rationally cast aside group thought and realize there is no criteria where a quarterback has to be number one. Is your opinion based on individual or team loyalty and therefore biased? Who is at the top? Tom Brady? Peyton Manning? Tony Romo? Brett Favre? LaDanian Tomlinson, Adrian Peterson?

Where does Randy Moss fall on your list?

We could focus on all the off the field drama people love to run with… or the scrutiny that propagates the golden boy image the media seems to swing on incessantly for the sake of the dollar, but we just don’t do that here. Yes quarterbacks commandeer the franchise and sell tickets based on groupie psychology, but we cannot nullify the worth of who really makes teams go.

Randy Moss is the best player in the NFL.

It’s 1998 again.

Randy has single-handedly modified the league and along with Tom Brady negated anything the Colts did last year–at least until a champion is crowned in February after the Super Bowl.

This isn’t diminishing anything Tom Brady accomplished this year. 50 touchdowns is 50 touchdowns. It also can’t be diminished that half of those went to Randy Moss as Wes Welker and Donte Stallworth were being shadowed by inferior coverage men.

The question that is going to be answered in the next couple weeks should be: Is Randy Moss finally going to be a champion?

16-0 means nothing with out the confetti reign [sic].

The time has come. The Divisional Playoff weekend is usually where the best games are played. You have rested top seeds versus hungry us against the world NFL (read: human) interest stories that late into games will entertain until daddy tells Cinderella to get her ass home.

The Patriots against the upstart and very formidable Jacksonville Jaguars–who on the surface appear to be capable of upsetting the Pats and shutting down history.The moral here is don’t bet the house people.

Most pundits will highlight Tom Brady as if he’s the only story that will sell papers.

What about Randy Moss (should have been co-MVP and co-OPY)?

Afro just right long, defiance to the media and its misguided fans strong, “Oh, little Bobby don’t wear his jersey…he’s just so wrong.”

There are always going to be those who will never like R. Moss. They will scream about faux-mooning the Green Bay fans–even though the Lambeau grateful do the same to opposing players (Joe Buck you were disgusting for your pandering description on live television when this went down). How about Randy walking off the field before the final gun or the incident with the traffic agent (Not a traffic cop, which has widely been reported. Not absolving blame, just how the facts were reported.) in Minneapolis? Critics will highlight Notre Dame rescinding its scholarship offer to Randy after he pleaded guilty for his involvement in a racial incident or Florida State doing the same because of a failed drug test.

These incidents are much more deeper than you think.

Check the origin of scrutiny shoved in Randy’s direction. This goes back to high school. You never know what forces are behind his media undoing and resurrection.

I’m implore you to do the research.

During his time with the Vikings Randy Moss became the most feared offensive NFL player along the likes of Barry Sanders, Jerry Rice and Joe Montana. His rookie season was one of the greatest of all time regardless of the sport. The record 556 points the Vikings scored stood for nine years until the Pats broke the longstanding record by scoring 589 this past regular season.

It’s not ironic the two teams who will share the record have Randy Moss in common. It’s a shame Daunte Culpepper tore his knee which precipitated a full blown overhauling of the Vikings roster. There were ownership changes as well, so I guess time moves on.

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“I love this cat, but why does he have to be so damn good?”

So the Vikings do something I don’t think professional teams should ever do which is trade Hall of Fame caliber players. It fragments your fan base. Not only in your hometown, but nationally. Why teams would take that financial as well as psychological hit is beyond me.

The Raiders thought they were getting a savior. It honestly seemed like a perfect fit, but Oakland just didn’t have the administrative stability to handle such a once in a life time superstar. He had no quarterback to get him the ball. That is glaring. What the critics were seeing in Randy was someone to attach blame. Yeah, 102 catches, 1,558 yards and 11 touchdowns in two years is not up to par if you are Randy Moss, but damn that’s a career for some receivers. Randy did what he could do with what he had surrounding him talent wise. That’s a fact and anything else surmised from Randy’s tenure in Oakland is chock full of hatred veiled or otherwise.
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Puttin’ on this hat is painful

Did I miss something? Oakland gave away Randy Moss for a fourth round pick?

Stupidity.

Raider nation gone and I’ve been traded to the New England Patriots? Oh next year it’s gonna be on!

98 catches, 1,493 yards and 23 touchdown receptions. Ruminate on that Al Davis.

Seriously, how did the league–and it’s fans–allow the Patriots to easily steal the second best receiver of all time like Sweatshirt Bully greedily jackin’ the hand signals of Peyton Manning checking off?

Pundits reference RMoss in Oakland as proof he was washed up. Does anyone remember the Monday night game where Randy ran track on the Patriots? Let me refresh your mind: 5 catches for 130 yards and a 73 yard touchdown.

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Bill was makin’ a list and checkin’ it twice

Dude even had to deal with Raider defensive end turned Fox commentator Howie Long’s misguided comments and responded with this:

“For him to take a shot at me and say that I don’t have a passion for the game, I love the passion for the game. If I don’t have that much passion, you tell his (bleep) to come out here and put on some pads on and go at me,” Moss told Steve Czaban, of Fox Sports Radio.

Long’s silence was golden.

98 catches, 1,493 yards and 23 touchdown receptions.

Check out the careers of Barkley, Owens, and Moss. Each was surrounded with Hall of Fame talent the minute they stepped into their respective leagues. This inspired hunger and spoiled them professionally in a sense. They wanted nothing but the best and stopped at nothing to achieve what is deservedly theirs.

When athletes in these situations complain, why is America confused?

They want to win! When they see members of their organization progressing a step behind emotionally as well as professionally, drama happens.

This is where the fallacy of pack writing rears it’s nondescript head.

Stretchin’ the field, he’s a quarterback’s shield, db’s job security he continuously kills.

(Photo: Lynne Sladky, AP)
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You boys betta get ya daddy!

He has made some bad choices. How many talented brothas have gone through something similar and not made it out of the other side?

The numbers are soul shaking.

He’s also done some things in the NFL that border on the astounding. The list is still growing. He and Brady have redefined the quarterback to receiver dynamic.

It’s inconceivable that Randy Moss didn’t win Offensive Player of the Year after breaking Jerry Rice’s records. He didn’t receive one first place vote. I’ll pass on the MVP argument because unfortunately this is a society that needs to be led–hence Tom Brady winning the award.

HIS-story chalks up yet another one for kids to forget about.

Remember Albert Belle’s 1995 season where he didn’t win MVP? Didn’t think so.

Belle’s stats: 143 games, 121 runs, 173 hits, 52 doubles, 50 homers, 126 RBI, .317 batting average, 80 strikeouts and a ridiculous .690 slugging percentage. 50 homers and 50 doubles is possibly the most unique stat in baseball history. It’s never been touched. Oh for the record, Cleveland made the playoffs that year.

Now let’s compare them to MVP Mo Vaughn’s stats: 140 games, 98 runs, 165 hits, 28 doubles, 39 homers, 126 RBI, 150 strikeouts, .300 batting average and a .575 slugging percentage. Boston also went to the playoffs. I alluded to this glaring injustice here.

Does it really matter if a player has a contentious relationship with the media when it comes to the handling of awards? What happened to Belle that year was criminal.

Don’t give me the standard Randy Moss is given just as much credit as Tom Brady bs. It’s just not true.

When kids check the books 50 years from now and see Tom Brady and Brett Favre getting the lion share of coverage, how will they properly place the context of what New England accomplished this year?

Straight hatred homie!

Could it have been because of this response after he set the td reception record (youtube clip deleted)?

Jerry Rice responded in a radio interview with: “It’s almost like a little slap in the face, but that’s typical of Randy Moss.”

Jerry you should have kept your mouth shut and checked the tape before you let the media goad you into such a ridiculous judgment of Randy. You’ve talked trash about the cat his entire career, so why should he ever respect you?

Way to speak up Randy. Now go get all of Jerry’s records. Jerry had to work hard at what you do so flawlessly.

Randy’s media response was a moment Larry Holmes would be proud of.

We should all be able to live with that.

************************

Added 8/1/11

Randy was not perfect and anyone saying he was is a fool but his talent can’t be questioned. Swann, Jefferson and Carter were prettier, Owens stronger, Brown more hard working, Rice better overall and Irvin more of a showman, but I’d be hard pressed to not take Randy Moss first (depending on the offense and qb) in his prime. Of the players I’ve seen, my top five would go Rice, Moss, Irvin, Carter, Owens with the hardworking Tim Brown just off the list.

Who are your top 5?

Randy Moss:

Career Stats
Season Team Receiving Rushing Fumbles
G GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2010 Tennessee Titans 8 4 6 80 13.3 26 0
2010 Minnesota Vikings 4 4 13 174 13.4 37T 2
2010 New England Patriots 4 3 9 139 15.4 35T 3
2009 New England Patriots 16 16 83 1,264 15.2 71T 13 2 1
2008 New England Patriots 16 16 69 1,008 14.6 76T 11 2 0 0.0 2 0 3 2
2007 New England Patriots 16 16 98 1,493 15.2 65T 23
2006 Oakland Raiders 13 13 42 553 13.2 51 3
2005 Oakland Raiders 16 15 60 1,005 16.8 79 8
2004 Minnesota Vikings 13 13 49 767 15.7 82T 13 1 1
2003 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 111 1,632 14.7 72 17 6 18 3.0 11 0 1 1
2002 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 106 1,347 12.7 60 7 6 51 8.5 25 0 1 1
2001 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 82 1,233 15.0 73T 10 3 38 12.7 18 0
2000 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 77 1,437 18.7 78T 15 3 5 1.7 9 0 2 0
1999 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 80 1,413 17.7 67T 11 4 43 10.8 15 0 3 3
1998 Minnesota Vikings 16 11 69 1,313 19.0 61T 17 1 4 4.0 4 0 2 1
TOTAL 954 14,858 15.6 82 153 25 159 6.4 25 0 15 10

Terrell Owens:

Career Stats
Season Team Receiving Rushing Fumbles
G GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2010 Cincinnati Bengals 14 11 72 983 13.7 78T 9
2009 Buffalo Bills 16 16 55 829 15.1 98T 5 6 54 9.0 29T 1 1 0
2008 Dallas Cowboys 16 16 69 1,052 15.2 75T 10 7 33 4.7 8 0 1 1
2007 Dallas Cowboys 15 15 81 1,355 16.7 52T 15 1 5 5.0 5 0
2006 Dallas Cowboys 16 15 85 1,180 13.9 56T 13
2005 Philadelphia Eagles 7 7 47 763 16.2 91T 6 1 2 2.0 2 0
2004 Philadelphia Eagles 14 14 77 1,200 15.6 59T 14 3 -5 -1.7 6 0 2 1
2003 San Francisco 49ers 15 15 80 1,102 13.8 75T 9 3 -2 -0.7 3 0
2002 San Francisco 49ers 14 14 100 1,300 13.0 76T 13 7 79 11.3 38T 1
2001 San Francisco 49ers 16 16 93 1,412 15.2 60T 16 4 21 5.3 12 0
2000 San Francisco 49ers 14 13 97 1,451 15.0 69T 13 3 11 3.7 5 0 3 2
1999 San Francisco 49ers 14 14 60 754 12.6 36 4 1 1
1998 San Francisco 49ers 16 10 67 1,097 16.4 79T 14 4 53 13.3 21T 1 1 1
1997 San Francisco 49ers 16 15 60 936 15.6 56T 8 1 0
1996 San Francisco 49ers 16 10 35 520 14.9 46T 4 1 1
TOTAL 1,078 15,934 14.8 98 153 39 251 6.4 38 3 11 7

Michael Irvin (big moments in big spots):

Career Stats
Season Team Receiving Rushing Fumbles
G GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
1999 Dallas Cowboys 4 4 10 167 16.7 37T 3
1998 Dallas Cowboys 16 15 74 1,057 14.3 51 1 1 1 1.0 1 0 1 0
1997 Dallas Cowboys 16 16 75 1,180 15.7 55 9
1996 Dallas Cowboys 11 11 64 962 15.0 61 2 1 1
1995 Dallas Cowboys 16 16 111 1,603 14.4 50 10 1 1
1994 Dallas Cowboys 16 16 79 1,241 15.7 65T 6
1993 Dallas Cowboys 16 16 88 1,330 15.1 61T 7 2 6 3.0 9 0
1992 Dallas Cowboys 16 14 78 1,396 17.9 87T 7 1 -9 -9.0 -9 0 1 1
1991 Dallas Cowboys 16 16 93 1,523 16.4 66T 8 3 0
1990 Dallas Cowboys 12 20 413 20.7 61T 5
1989 Dallas Cowboys 6 26 378 14.5 65T 2 1 6 6.0 6 0
1988 Dallas Cowboys 14 32 654 20.4 61T 5 1 2 2.0 2 0
TOTAL 750 11,904 15.9 87 65 6 6 1.0 9 0 7 3

Cris Carter:

Career Stats
Season Team Receiving Rushing Fumbles
G GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2002 Miami Dolphins 5 1 8 66 8.3 15 1 1 1
2001 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 73 871 11.9 52 6 1 4 4.0 4 0 2 2
2000 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 96 1,274 13.3 53 9 3 1
1999 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 90 1,241 13.8 68 13
1998 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 78 1,011 13.0 54T 12 1 -1 -1.0 -1 0
1997 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 89 1,069 12.0 43 13 3 1
1996 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 96 1,163 12.1 43T 10 1 1
1995 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 122 1,371 11.2 60T 17 1 0 0.0 0 0
1994 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 122 1,256 10.3 65T 7 4 1
1993 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 86 1,071 12.5 58 9
1992 Minnesota Vikings 12 12 53 681 12.8 44 6 5 15 3.0 6 0 1 1
1991 Minnesota Vikings 16 16 72 962 13.4 50 5 1 0
1990 Minnesota Vikings 16 27 413 15.3 78T 3 2 6 3.0 8 0
1989 Philadelphia Eagles 16 45 605 13.4 42 11 2 16 8.0 11 0
1988 Philadelphia Eagles 16 39 761 19.5 80T 6 1 1 1.0 1 0
1987 Philadelphia Eagles 9 5 84 16.8 25 2
TOTAL 1,101 13,899 12.6 80 130 13 41 3.2 11 0 16 8

Jerry Rice the GOAT:

Career Stats
Season Team Receiving Rushing Fumbles
G GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2004 Seattle Seahawks 11 9 25 362 14.5 56 3
2004 Oakland Raiders 6 5 5 67 13.4 18 0
2003 Oakland Raiders 16 15 63 869 13.8 47T 2 2 1
2002 Oakland Raiders 16 16 92 1,211 13.2 75 7 3 20 6.7 12 0 1 1
2001 Oakland Raiders 16 15 83 1,139 13.7 40T 9 1 0
2000 San Francisco 49ers 16 16 75 805 10.7 68T 7 1 -2 -2.0 -2 0 3 2
1999 San Francisco 49ers 16 16 67 830 12.4 62 5 2 13 6.5 11 0
1998 San Francisco 49ers 16 16 82 1,157 14.1 75T 9 2 2
1997 San Francisco 49ers 2 1 7 78 11.1 16 1 1 -10 -10.0 -10 0
1996 San Francisco 49ers 16 16 108 1,254 11.6 39 8 11 77 7.0 38 1
1995 San Francisco 49ers 16 16 122 1,848 15.1 81T 15 5 36 7.2 20T 1 3 3
1994 San Francisco 49ers 16 16 112 1,499 13.4 69T 13 7 93 13.3 28T 2 1 1
1993 San Francisco 49ers 16 16 98 1,503 15.3 80T 15 3 69 23.0 43T 1 3 0
1992 San Francisco 49ers 16 16 84 1,201 14.3 80T 10 9 58 6.4 26T 1 2 1
1991 San Francisco 49ers 16 16 80 1,206 15.1 73T 14 1 2 2.0 2 0 1 0
1990 San Francisco 49ers 16 100 1,502 15.0 64T 13 2 0 0.0 2 0
1989 San Francisco 49ers 16 82 1,483 18.1 68T 17 5 33 6.6 17 0
1988 San Francisco 49ers 16 64 1,306 20.4 96T 9 13 107 8.2 29 1
1987 San Francisco 49ers 12 65 1,078 16.6 57T 22 8 51 6.4 17 1
1986 San Francisco 49ers 16 86 1,570 18.3 66T 15 10 72 7.2 18 1
1985 San Francisco 49ers 16 49 927 18.9 66T 3 6 26 4.3 15T 1
TOTAL 1,549 22,895 14.8 96 197 87 645 7.4 43 10 19 11

How about Tim Brown you ask?

Career Stats
Season Team Receiving Rushing Fumbles
G GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 15 4 24 200 8.3 21 1 2 1
2003 Oakland Raiders 16 15 52 567 10.9 36T 2 0 0 0
2002 Oakland Raiders 16 16 81 930 11.5 45 2 6 19 3.2 9 0 3 1
2001 Oakland Raiders 16 16 91 1,165 12.8 46T 9 4 39 9.8 19 0 1 1
2000 Oakland Raiders 16 16 76 1,128 14.8 45 11 3 12 4.0 7 0
1999 Oakland Raiders 16 16 90 1,344 14.9 47 6 1 4 4.0 4 0
1998 Oakland Raiders 16 16 81 1,012 12.5 49 9 1 -7 -7.0 -7 0 3 0
1997 Oakland Raiders 16 16 104 1,408 13.5 59T 5 5 19 3.8 12 0 1 1
1996 Oakland Raiders 16 16 90 1,104 12.3 42T 9 6 35 5.8 15 0 3 1
1995 Oakland Raiders 16 16 89 1,342 15.1 80T 10
1994 Los Angeles Raiders 16 16 89 1,309 14.7 77T 9 3 3
1993 Los Angeles Raiders 16 16 80 1,180 14.8 71T 7 2 7 3.5 14 0 1 1
1992 Los Angeles Raiders 15 12 49 693 14.1 68T 7 3 -4 -1.3 3 0 6 5
1991 Los Angeles Raiders 16 1 36 554 15.4 78T 5 5 16 3.2 9 0 1 0
1990 Los Angeles Raiders 16 18 265 14.7 51 3
1989 Los Angeles Raiders 1 1 8 8.0 8 0
1988 Los Angeles Raiders 16 43 725 16.9 65T 5 14 50 3.6 12 1
TOTAL 1,094 14,934 13.7 80 100 50 190 3.8 19 1 24 14

12 Responses to “Randy Moss: The Strength, Speed, Charisma and Fallacy of 81”

  1. thomas friend says:

    Ain’t this some ish. This article calls out Schefter and Peter King for tweeting mess to get Vince and Cam in some media circus.

    http://thebiglead.com/index.php/2011/08/01/the-iconic-dream-team-of-espns-adam-schefter-and-sports-illustrateds-peter-king/

    They are all over our internets and television. They travel the world, get paid more than you and me (well, definitely me, not sure about you), have a sense of entitlement, and tend to say petulant or irresponsible things at times – it’s bound to happen when you speak so often to the media. I’m speaking, of course, of the national celebrity sports writer/reporter. The story shouldn’t be about them, but sometimes it is.

    This weekend, we had two different cases of the use of a powerful voice in an irresponsible fashion. On Saturday, Adam Schefter said via Twitter “Eagles already are referring to themselves as ‘The Dream Team.” Over 800,000 people follow Adam Schefter’s messages, and that particular one was passed on (re-tweeted for us cool kids) by well more than 100 to their followers.

    Was it remotely accurate? No. At best it was irresponsible. Twitter can be a powerful tool, though, with short messages passed on quickly and viewed, often amongst many others in real time, that form a blurry and spontaneous reality. I had something saying, “yes, the Eagles did say this” in the back of my head, probably from glancing over this tweet that day.

    “The Eagles” would imply an organization or even at best a large group of notable players saying this. From what I can find, the reference comes from a singular quote from now backup quarterback Vince Young, about joining the organization and all the other moves they were making at the time. While taken out of context, it makes it seem that Young is declaring the Eagles to be on the level with, say, the USA Olympic Basketball team, or a historically great football team, that’s probably not what he meant. He was specifically asked about what he thought of the Eagles in free agency so far:

    “Dream Team. From [CB] Nnamdi [Asomugha] to [CB Dominique Rodgers-] Cromartie, and from [DE] Jason [Babin] to myself, I know they’re going to do some more things. It’s beautiful to see where we’re trying to go. I’m all for it. Whatever they ask me to do, to be scout team quarterback or quarterback learning, do whatever it is. I just want to be here to help and be a part of a team. I’m just happy to be a part of the Philadelphia Eagles.”

    Maybe he was being conceited and declaring the team the Super Bowl favorites. The Dream Team line certainly spawned lots of commentary. I read it more in the context of a dream organization for him that is willing to go out and make these moves to win. Nothing wrong with saying that.

    But Schefter’s tweet is like the whisper game, about 10 people down the line. It is presented as fact, and portrays an image. It furthers a narrative. But it is irresponsible because it is not true in any way.

    Then there is Peter King. He apparently was taking in practice at Panthers’ camp Sunday. Afterward, he sent this message out:

    Interesting but not too surprising: Just got stiffed at Panther camp by Cam Newton. Chose not to talk to me post-evening practice.

    Peter King is followed by almost 600,000 people, and much like with with Schefter’s tweet, it was re-sent by well over 100 people to everyone else that follows them, and spread like wildfire. (For comparison, just so you don’t get the impression everything King says is passed along so vigorously, his later tweet about coffee at a McDonalds was for some reason sent along by six desperate souls.)

    As Toby Maguire once told us, with great power comes great responsibility. King acts like a toddler who didn’t get his toy at the sandbox. Did everyone who read that or passed that along understand the nuances there, and what King really might have meant by “not too surprising?” Probably not. Did he explain that several months earlier, leading into the combine, he casually tweeted out after he did get a private interview with Newton:

    Newton: “I see myself not only as a football player, but an entertainer and icon.” Ron Rivera, Chan Gailey, John Harbaugh blanch.

    This launched quite a storm about Cam Newton and his attitude. It caused Cam Newton to have to explain the comments, and he didn’t really throw Peter King under the bus publicly (unlike King’s behavior last night), even though I think it’s quite possible Newton felt at best taken out of context. King’s “not too surprising” then may be referring to Newton not wanting to be “misunderstood” by King in a private conversation again. I wasn’t there and Cam Newton didn’t talk to me either, so I don’t know the full details–maybe he had other commitments, maybe he just didn’t want to talk to King specifically but did talk to others. King, though, conveys a certain feeling with words like “not too surprising” and “stiffed”.

    But King knows how people will take those comments. They further a storyline. They insert King into the story. It’s almost like, in addition to being a writer, he thinks he’s an icon and an entertainer who is bigger than the stories he reports.

  2. MODI says:

    Jerry is GOAT, but in his absolute prime, not even Jeryy was better. he was jerry with a few inches and a 5th gear. And if he had Montana and Steve Young throwing to him for his career, he may have had every record.

  3. Yep. I totally agree Modi. Thomas I’m letting your comment digest and will get to it shortly.

  4. MODI says:

    Good call out by Big Lead… How dare Cam Newton not speak to King after practice! Who does this guy think he is!

    And watch Shefter and ESPN turn the Eagles into this year’s Miami Heat… It’s starting…

  5. HarveyDent says:

    The Big Lead post summed up perfectly the problem I have with many writers of mainstream sports nowadays where they feel the need to make themselves part of the story or even create the story…lookin’ at you ESPN. I haven’t read anything by Peter King since those shots he took at McNabb last year after the benching in Washington and Schefter just seems a little too polished for me like he needs to be handling the press requests for Mitt Romney or something. Just the same stuff many of us rail against here on TSF because too many sports reporters are only happy trotting out the same old tropes of good vs evil and David vs Goliath without ever bothering to think that maybe readers/viewers would be more interested in reading a complete narrative that tells the unvarnished truth about flawed humans just like all of us trying to do the best they can. Barry Bonds might truly be an ass but put out there that he was also the greatest player of the last thirty years. Tim Tebow might really be a genuinely decent guy but don’t try to sell me that he’s taken Adam’s place on the Sistine Chapel. Just give me some balance for my money and/or views.

    I’ll comment on Moss when I really believe he’s retired.

  6. Ron Glover says:

    The worst thing they’ve done is put Peter King on camera and put his fat head in front of a mic.

    He shouldn’t be the only person in the MSM that Newton blows off.

  7. Miranda says:

    I dont think Randy’s retired for real. Give it a few weeks, he’ll be back.

    The sports media is just like the political media….completely disgusting.

  8. RBD says:

    As Jack Palance’s character in “City Slickers” said, “Day ain’t over yet.” Moss will be back. About Oct. 1, a team will realize it needs a new WR, and by then, every team will have forgotten about this needless, obsessively overcovered thing called Training Camp. Moss will show up somewhere and play every bit as well as if he had participated throughout these next few weeks.

  9. Temple3 says:

    Good morning all:

    Schefter has been doing this mess for several years. He is always getting scooped by Jay Glazer. His information is almost always false, incomplete, late or all of the above. I suspect he’s just a lazy %@@! who fits the demographic and moved from NFL.com where guys like Mike Mayock would kick him down a flight of stairs. He’s right at home with ESPN’s low standards.

    As for King-a-ling, he actually knows a lot about football, but he’s simply a self-righteous, entitled d!$# who thinks his readership should worship his keyboard.
    ———————————————————–

    I don’t know that Moss would have fared any better in SF. He had a GREAT set up in Minnesota. It seems like the wheels fell off after 2004 when Culpepper was injured. The bottom line is that the Vikings made 2 DISASTROUS hires at head coach. Mike Tice was terrible and Childress may have been worse.

    Those 2 were simply not cut out for that position. Neither is a leader of men and that’s fatal if Moss is in your locker room. Maybe if the Vikings had pulled the string earlier and went with a Frazier or Tomlin-type earlier, they would have been able to maintain their flow.

    Either way, the table was set for Moss to destroy all of Rice’s records in Minnesota. He needed that continuity. I suspect that Culpepper’s injury and the rise of Tice and Childress had a great deal to do with his career.

    When he was doing his thing, no one was better.

  10. Origin says:

    If this is the end of the line for Moss….I want to say he was one of the most feared offensive players I have ever seen next Bo Jackson, Jerry Rice and Barry Sanders.

    Brotha Temple Vikings traded Moss right after Culpepper’s great 2004 season. Before the 2005 season Moss was traded to the Raiders. The sad part is that the team traded Moss and all they got Duante was that bust Troy Williamson….Pep was trying to do too much on that team. He had no running game and crap WRs. On the play he got injured he tried to scramble to pick up yards vs. Carolina and a DB went low and blew the brothas knee out. That 2004 season was amazing Culpepper had that record breaking season and Moss had the pulled hamstring and was playing on one leg the whole season. That punk owner traded Moss after the season because of an incident that happened on the team bus plus the whole so called mooning incident with the Packer fans. If I remember correctly Zigi Wilf was pissed at that fool Mcombs for trading Moss right before he bought the team.

    IMO the 2 worst things that happened to Moss was Denny Green being fired and being traded away from Culpepper (as you said brotha Temple).

    As far as Peter King he is a bigot been one for as long as I have known about the fool. From him questioning coach Dungy’s intelligence the year after winning the superbowl to when that dirty SOB said that Steve Deberg was a better QB then Moon because Moon played in a pass happy offense. I am glad Newton blew that punk off.

    As far as Adam Shefter he is a shady bum and his only claim to fame is getting inside info from his buddy Shanahan. The only time he ever gets anything right is when a rumor deals with Shanny on some level……for example Mcnabb. Shefty fits in perfectly with those shady word twisting jokers at the world wide liar.

    Funny how just this past week those idiots on ESPN First Take took a 12 minute press conference from Mcnabb with the minnesota media and took a 30 second comment about his salary and made it seem as though the whole press conference was about that.

    Damn everytime I watch ESPN I feel Dirty and need to take a bath.

  11. Origin says:

    When I say most feared offensive players I mean skilled players…..because if I included QBs Cunningham and Vick would be on that list also.

  12. Temple3 says:

    Great points.

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